Fashion deserves the glossies

When designers create their collections, it takes months of research and preparation before the final vision is made. Once collections are complete, it is a lengthy process to campaign for them, shoot the designs to then send to fashion magazines for them to be published. 

Fashion is an art form, self-expression, a vision that is created by an inspired mind, and so after all this work has gone in behind the clothes, should they deserve anything less than to be published in anything other than a glossy magazine?

Sally Anne Argyle, currently working as a freelance stylist at Zest Magazine, said: “I love holding a magazine in my hands, feeling that paper and turning the page.

“There are amazing online magazines, but there is nothing quite like the real thing. Especially when you’ve done a beautiful shoot, printed on beautiful paper and it looks amazing, but online the images are flat.”

Sally-Anne Argyle spent weeks organising this main fashion story, that was kept under wraps until it was available to buy

Sally-Anne Argyle spent weeks organising this main fashion story, that was kept under wraps until the magazine was available to buy

A survey conducted with 18-25-year-olds found that nearly 60 per cent enjoyed reading magazines the most over newspapers and blogs. 

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Regardless of content, or whether the readers’ trust who is writing, magazines are seen as a luxury, associated with relaxation and enjoyment, away from the chaos that they can be inundated with online.

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Cosmopolitan embraces social media

image_1356910141562926Drenched in social media and with almost 50 per cent of the cover stories having been influenced by blogging, twitter and instagram, it is clear that journalism has entered a stage where a digital cross over is the key to survival.

Fashion assistant at Cosmopolitan, Holly Coopey, believes that the power will always remain in fashion magazines, but it is paramount for print to embrace the internet.

She said: “The digital platform is expanding at a rapid rate and we all need to evolve to produce content which fits on both platforms and has the maximum outreach.”

Though as oppose to fashion bloggers, the idea in print is not to create a reader community but to instead create content to inform, inspire and encourage creativity.

This not only maintains the one to many foundation on which print publications talk to their readers, but it also enforces a hierarchy representative of the research that has gone into making every published article.

“Print features with interviews often take weeks of work, a lot of online content can often be rough summaries of quick vox pops and info found online,” she said. “The authenticity of a lot of digital stories is questionable sometimes.”

Cosmopolitan has handled their digital cross over with great caution, making sure the quality of the magazine is transferred online while maintaining print values.

As with most print publications, the team have had to learn new roles and become multi-platform journalists.

She said: “The whole team takes responsibility for social media from a fashion point of view. We have to be careful we don’t compromise what we are producing though, so we keep shoot images behind closed doors until they are in print and on the shelf.”